Candy Is Dandy But Liquor Is Quicker

Contents: Meaning | Origin | Spread

Meaning

What does Candy Is Dandy But Liquor Is Quicker mean?

Candy is dandy but liquor is quicker is an idiomatic expression that was invented by American poet Ogden Nash, that later became a popular equivoque in pop-culture.

The meaning behind the wordplay suggests that when you encounter a problem, you should contemplate the tools in your arsenal, because every problem requires a different solution.

In the idiom’s analogy, this means that candy is a good motivator, but liquor will make it even easier to convince or persuade somebody.

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Origin

What's the origin of Candy Is Dandy But Liquor Is Quicker?

American poet F. Ogden Nash wrote about 500 off-handed, simplistic poems in the 20th century.

He published his poem “Reflections on Ice Breaking” in 1931, in a journal called The Virginia Reel.

The entirety of the poem was literally “Candy / Is dandy / But liquor / Is quicker.”, divided into four lines, which really signals the simplistic style of Nash’s works.

The line was then featured in the 1971 hit-movie Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory, which was helpful for the popularization of the term.

Spread & Usage

How did Candy Is Dandy But Liquor Is Quicker spread?

After the appearance made in Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory, Candy is dandy but liquor is quicker became a popular expression for a few years, but it declined gradually throughout the late 20th century.

In the early 2010s, various image macro memes started to appear online that featured images of Willy Wonka.

The movie’s scene in which the term was uttered is also uploaded on YouTube, uploaded to the channel ZegaNega.

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