Hell Hath No Fury Like a Woman Scorned

Contents: Meaning | Origin | Spread

Meaning

What does Hell Hath No Fury Like a Woman Scorned mean?

Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned is a popular colloquialism in English, originating from a misquote from the tragedy of William Congreve: The Mourning Bride.

The expression is used to refer to the devastating aftermath of a woman, whose pride and honor has been stained.

For another literary quote, referring to hell, see Abandon All Hope Ye Who Enter Here.

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Origin

What's the origin of Hell Hath No Fury Like a Woman Scorned?

William Congreve’s play premiered in 1697 with the title The Mourning Bride, which tells the story of an abducted queen and a web of love, ending in a tragic mistaken suicide.

It is in this play, that the quote “Heav’n has no Rage, like Love to Hatred turn’d, Nor Hell a Fury, like a Woman scorn’d.” originates from.

Over the years, the quote has shifted into its current form: “Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned”.

Spread & Usage

How did Hell Hath No Fury Like a Woman Scorned spread?

The colloquialism became a widespread cliché over the centuries, appearing in countless contexts, from literature through drama to movies.

More recent titles that refer to or were straight up named after the quote include Tyler Perry’s play “Hell Hath No Fury Like a Woman Scorned” as well as The Steve Harvey Show.

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